A password will be e-mailed to you.

19-09-2018

*|MC:SUBJECT|*
September 19, 2018
QUOTE OF THE DAY

“It depends on where you live.” Your income tax, your corruption threshold, and now the likelihood that robots will take your job.
Share
Tweet
Forward

MIDWEEK MADNESS

This newsletter features insight from Mez Belo-Osagie.
YOU BETTER WORK!
The Story
The Senate may be in recess but Bukola Saraki is #MakingMoves.
 
Who?
Nigeria's current Senate President
 
What's he done now?
This week, the Saraki campaign began to send emails and text messages to registered voters, reintroducing him as a presidential candidate.

I’m listening…
Saraki 2019 has two slogans: “Let’s Grow Nigeria” and “Follow Person Wey Sabi Road”, two high-key critiques of the Buhari administration’s poor economic performance and difficulty in attracting technocrats. Since defecting from APC, Saraki has defiantly reaffirmed that he will keep his position in the Senate until his term was up and even bagged an endorsement from Ibrahim Babangida.
 
Back up, IBB?
IBB.
 
So what's next?
Saraki has an uphill road ahead of him. He's competing for PDP’s presidential nomination against former Vice President, Alhaji Atiku Abubakar, Sokoto State Governor, Aminu Tambuwal, former Cross River State Governor, Donald Duke, and former Kano State Governor Rabiu Kwankwaso.

Looks tense
Sis...

But what does this mean for Saraki?
For one, he has more to lose from a failed presidential bid than many other candidates. Plus, his position as Senate President depends on PDP maintaining their majority. Since he defected to the PDP, relations between Saraki and major APC party figures have been strained. If he fails, and PDP falls short of reaffirming its majority, he could not only lose his seat but may also be subject to continued investigation.
 
What we're watching
To protect his position as Senate President, Saraki may seek to use the APC's strategy against them in gathering allies, by picking off disaffected members or exploiting intra-party riffs.
Share
Tweet
Forward
Want Beef?
The Story
The International Criminal Court faces renewed criticism.
 
Context™
African leaders have long been critical of the ICC for its lack of accountability and its institutional racism. While the organisation has received over 100,000 complaints of possible crimes in over 100 countries, it has only ever indicted 41 black Africans.

What's happening?
Recently, the ICC seemed to be addressing its criticisms by moving to investigate potential war crimes by US forces in Afghanistan. The investigation provoked an excoriating critique from US National Security Adviser, John Bolton. Bolton described the Court as an attack on US sovereignty. His comments should come as no surprise—Trump administration officials have generally pushed back against globalism and continue to insist that America lies outside the bounds of international law.
 
What we think
Despite the ICC's questionable focus on Africa, African countries should be cautious about following Bolton's remarks. Especially because even America's courts cannot ignore the world.
Share
Tweet
Forward

#StayWoke

What to ask when a project you've closed out requires updates
Still? Boko Haram remains a deadly menace in North-East Nigeria. For several months, human rights groups have been reporting that residents are being forced back into unsafe towns in order to register to vote. This week witnessed an attack on the town Guzamala that witnesses claim killed dozens; the government had previously declared it safe.
Share
Tweet
Forward
What to say at your next salary negotiation
Higher. Yesterday, South Africa legalized the private use of cannabis becoming the third country in Africa, after Lesotho and Zimbabwe, to do so. Just a few days before, former Nigerian president, Olusegun Obasanjo, urged West African governments to decriminalize drug use, arguing that "Prison does not reform".
Share
Tweet
Forward
What not to say when your manager spots a typo in your presentation deck
Corruption denies millions access to quality education in Nigeria. 
Share
Tweet
Forward
How you really felt at your performance review
Tense. Cameroon's elections are just 3 weeks away, as President Paul Biya looks to extend his 35 years in power. Observers fear the region could slide into civil war. Cameroon has a francophone majority and its Anglophone population is routinely marginalized. Recently, Anglophone Cameroonians have been pressing for greater freedoms and autonomy but face violence and repression from their government. 
Share
Tweet
Forward
What Slack group admins are asking
Who is Zainab Ahmed?
Share
Tweet
Forward
How to actually bond with your team 
Watch the trailer for Lionheart, Nigeria's first Netflix original film. Look at Dakar at its most stylish. Share this newslett Listen to this Ghanaian pop-culture podcast. 
Share
Tweet
Forward
Know something we should be watching?
[email protected]