Current Issue Nigeria Imaginary

Vol. 8, No. 2

NIGERIA IMAGINARY

In This Issue

Nigeria Imaginary

EDITOR'S FOREWORD

Nigeria Imaginary

Our latest issue, Nigeria Imaginary, considers the restorative potential of Nigerian art and invites readers to explore the Nigeria Pavilion at the 2024 Venice Biennale, plus more.

Aindrea Emelife

COVER INTERVIEW

Toyin Ojih Odutola

COVER ESSAY

Toyin Ojih Odutola’s Theories of Place

The Nigeria Pavilion at the 2024 Venice Biennale brings together artists who are diverse in their styles, influences, affiliations with place, and interpretations of nationhood and history. Among them is Toyin Ojih Odutola, whose artistic instincts already bypass easy conceptions of place, belonging and history.

Ndidi Dike

COVER ESSAY

Ndidi Dike’s Thesis on the Nigerian Condition

‘Nigeria Imaginary’, the theme of the Nigeria Pavilion at the 2024 Venice Biennale, is a daring call to not just imagine Nigeria as a restored entity but to also dream its future into reality. Through Ndidi Dike, viewers experience the distinctly Nigerian desire to connect what Nigeria once was, what it is now and what it might become.

Yinka Shonibare

COVER ESSAY

Yinka Shonibare and the Case for Nigeria at the Venice Biennale

Through Yinka Shonibare CBE RA, the Nigeria Pavilion at the 2024 Venice Biennale presents a Nigeria that is more about routes than roots. A Nigeria that diagnoses its struggles with intricately imagined jokes while holding up a mirror to structural violence and broken promises. And a Nigeria that allows its children to return again and again in an ever-expanding array of visions and alternative futures.

Nigerian Literature

THE MINISTRY OF ARTS / BOOKS DEPT.

Reading the Great Nigerian Literary Debate

For several years now, a new generation of Nigerian writers and literary scholars has been debating the meaning of Nigerian literature. Last year, we finally came close to a breakthrough.

Pemi Aguda Ghostroots

THE MINISTRY OF ARTS / BOOKS DEPT.

Birdwoman

‘Why are they screaming? Felicity raises an arm to clear the smoke in front of her face. But her arm doesn’t rise. Instead, feathers flap.’ An excerpt from ’Pemi Aguda’s short story collection, Ghostroots.

Jos

THE MINISTRY OF ARTS / MUSIC DEPT.

The Songs of Jos

For a long time, the city of Jos has grappled with violence fuelled by religious and ethnic differences. But today, Jos is home to musicians and creative communities who are giving language to the traumas they witnessed growing up.

Don Jazzy

THE MINISTRY OF BUSINESS x THE ECONOMY

THE MINISTRY OF CULTURAL AFFAIRS

Who Will Bury Mr. Taiwo?

It took the Nigerian government 51 years to formally honour Taiwo Akinkunmi, the man who designed the Nigerian flag. Now, months after his death, his body remains in a morgue as his family awaits a state burial.

Skin-Bleaching

THE MINISTRY OF HEALTH

Abrahamic Tradition

THE MINISTRY OF MEMORIES

A Womanist Reading of African Women in Abrahamic Tradition

Though the presence of Abrahamic tradition within global Black consciousness often finds expression through male-dominated narratives, a closer examination uncovers Black women at the very centres of the most path-altering moments in the tradition, offering analogues with which Black women have interpreted, reimagined and reclaimed their past, present, and future.

West Africa

THE MINISTRY OF POLITICAL AFFAIRS

Geopolitical Projections in West Africa and the Wider Continent

A new element in geopolitics across Africa is the growth of political consciousness and the willingness to organize against unfavourable status quos. Recent events in Mali, Niger and Burkina Faso are representative of this new phase of relations between nations, governments and myriad interest groups.

King Charles

THE MINISTRY OF WORLD AFFAIRS

King Charles’ Non-Apology to Kenyans

Amidst global demands for reparations, King Charles offers Kenyans a (non)apology. But what substance can an apology from Britain hold, when its imperial and colonial crimes continue to shape and undo life in Kenya?

Noo Saro-Wiwa

FIRST DRAFT

the cover

‘Welcome to Venice,’ by Sarah N. Kanu

BUY the COVER + MORE

SPECIAL THANKS

Editors: Wale Lawal, Yusuf Omotayo, Peace Onafuye and Victoria Audu
Issue Design: Wale Lawal and Dami Mojid
Illustrators: Dami Mojid, Kevwe Ogini and Charles Owen
Funding Partners: 
The Museum of West African Art 

   
Purchase Subscribe
   

Vol. 8, No. 1

An African Feminist Manifesto Introduction
IN THIS ISSUE
FOREWORD
An African Feminist Manifesto: The Republic V8, N1 by Wale Lawal
COVER ESSAY
An African Feminist Manifesto: Towards Decolonial Worldmaking by Ololade Faniyi;
FEATURED ESSAYS
Funke Akindele’s Path to a Billion Naira: How the ‘Queen of Wakapass’ Seized the Heart of Nollywood by Assumpta Audu; A 40-Year-Old Japa Story: With a New Generation of Andrews Checking Out, Did Nigeria Really Survive? by Oyindamola Depo-Oyedokun; War Against Melanin: ​​​The Menace of Skin-Bleaching in Nigeria by Foyin Ejilola; ‘We Have the Same Destiny’: Geopolitical Projections in West Africa and the Wider Continent by Otobong Inieke; (Non)Apology Cannot Mean Repair: King Charles’ Non-Apology to Kenyans by Mumbi Kanyogo; Sacrifice and Rebirth: A Womanist Reading of African Women in Abrahamic Tradition by Kai Mora; How to Build a Dream Body: The Disruptive Potential of Frida Orupabo’s Metamorphic Women  by Kéchi Nne Nomu; The Adah Archetype: 50 Years of Buchi Emecheta’s Second Class Citizen by Peace Yetunde Onafuye; Shadows of a Forgotten Past: Unveiling the Truth of White Nanny, Black Child: Exploring the Untold Stories of Informally Fostered African Children in the UK by Jamila Pereira; and Imperialism is the Arsonist of Our Forests: Towards an African Climate Justice Agenda by Aby L. Sène.  
FIRST DRAFT
‘I Want My Writing to Sound on Paper How It Sounds in My Head and Heart’ by Oluwatomisin Olayinka Oredein
ART
⎈ Cover Illustration: ‘Women are Different, 2024’, by Diana Ejaita ⎈ Issue Design: Wale Lawal and Dami Mojid ⎈ Illustrators: Dami Mojid, Kevwe Ogini and Charles Owen.
Forthcoming
In our next issue, The Republic will critically discuss Neo-colonialism in Africa